Healthy, Happy Felines

A team of researchers from the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden published a paper last summer in the Journal of Nutrition that outlines how pollutants eliminate the protective properties that fatty fish have would otherwise act as a prevention to developing type 2 diabetes.

In the paper, the team describes how they used innovative techniques to come to this conclusion, which is likely to have an impact on future health studies, as well as on environmental priorities and food standards.

Recent years have seen the publication of several studies that have investigated the effect of consuming fatty fish on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. However, it has been difficult to conclude these studies as the results have been contradictory.

Some evidence has shown that regularly eating fatty fish can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, others have reported no effect, and others have even reported the reverse effect.

Given that around 10% of Americans have diabetes, and roughly 90% to 95% have type 2 diabetes, any potential preventative method should be thoroughly explored to help reduce the rates of the illness that puts people at increased risk of serious health complications.

The Sweden-based team aimed to resolve the puzzle presented by the conflicting evidence produced by previous research.

A new method was implemented in the study to determine what the participants had eaten, as a way of improving the accuracy of the dietary habit questionnaires that were also administered. A limitation of previous studies looking into the relationship of fatty fish consumption and diabetes is that they relied only on self-report questionnaires that are prone to error.

Researchers were able to minimize this error by using mass spectrometry-based metabolomics to identify and measure biomarkers related with fish consumption in the blood samples of participants.

This gave them a more objective measurement of the amount of fish each participant was consuming.

Healthy, Happy Felines

A team of researchers from the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden published a paper last summer in the Journal of Nutrition that outlines how pollutants eliminate the protective properties that fatty fish have would otherwise act as a prevention to developing type 2 diabetes.

In the paper, the team describes how they used innovative techniques to come to this conclusion, which is likely to have an impact on future health studies, as well as on environmental priorities and food standards.

Recent years have seen the publication of several studies that have investigated the effect of consuming fatty fish on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. However, it has been difficult to conclude these studies as the results have been contradictory.

Some evidence has shown that regularly eating fatty fish can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, others have reported no effect, and others have even reported the reverse effect.

Given that around 10% of Americans have diabetes, and roughly 90% to 95% have type 2 diabetes, any potential preventative method should be thoroughly explored to help reduce the rates of the illness that puts people at increased risk of serious health complications.

The Sweden-based team aimed to resolve the puzzle presented by the conflicting evidence produced by previous research.

A new method was implemented in the study to determine what the participants had eaten, as a way of improving the accuracy of the dietary habit questionnaires that were also administered. A limitation of previous studies looking into the relationship of fatty fish consumption and diabetes is that they relied only on self-report questionnaires that are prone to error.

Researchers were able to minimize this error by using mass spectrometry-based metabolomics to identify and measure biomarkers related with fish consumption in the blood samples of participants.

This gave them a more objective measurement of the amount of fish each participant was consuming.